The New Moon's Arms

My novel The New Moon's Arms is a February 2007 release from Warner/Hachette Books. It's my fourth novel. I was thinking about Nandor Fodor's theory that poltergeist phenomena are "caused not by spirits but by human agents suffering from intense repressed anger, hostility, and sexual tension." Some say that this may be why poltergeists so often manifest around young adults just going into puberty (primarily women, I think). The idea is that reaching sexual maturity in societies as sexually repressed as many of ours can be disturbing enough to some people that they begin to generate psychic phenomena.
The New Moon's Arms, my fourth novel. I'm not in the business of theorizing whether that's true or not. I was more interested in the idea. If the beginning of menstruation can be magic, I began to think about what it might be like if there were out-of-control psychic phenomena similarly associated with the ending of menstruation. Magical menopause! Enter my protagonist, who's 53 years old and going through the Change of life, but with some changes peculiarly her own:

I was boiling. When the sun got so warm?

"...most primitive living pinnipeds," said Hector.

God, the heat was getting worse.

"...derelict fishing nets...danger..."

Hector didn't even seem to notice it. Me, my whole body was burning. I could feel the tips of my ears getting red, my cheeks flushing.

"...Brucella...Calamity? You all right?"

"I don't know. Too much sun." I wiped some perspiration from my brow. My hand came away wet.

"You sweating like you just run a marathon."

"A lady doesn't sweat." But the dried salt from it was irritating my hand. I rubbed the hand against the fabric of my pants. "Jesus, it so hot!"

Hector looked worried. "That tree over there will give you some shade. Come."

But before we could take a step, something soft and light grazed my head from above, then landed at Hector's feet. "The hell is that?" he cried out. He bent to pick it up.

"It didn't hurt me. I'm okay." Much better, in fact. The heat was passing off rapidly. I was even chilly.

Hector straightened up. "Where this came from?" He looked up at the sky. I followed his gaze. Nothing but blue. Not even the cloud that must have just covered the sun and made me shiver.

Hector showed me the thing he was holding. I blinked the sun's glare out of my eyes.

I grabbed her out of Hector's hand. Bare Bear. Chastity's Bare Bear. Held so tightly and loved so hard that her little stuffed rump was threadbare, her little gingham dress long gone. "Where this came from?"

"Look like it just fell out of the sky."

"No, man; don't joke. It must have washed up with the tide."

"And landed on your head?"

"I don't know; maybe this was on the sand already, and something else fell on my head." Bare Bear winked her one glass eye at me. So long I hadn't seen her. "A leaf from out a sea grape tree, something like that. Right, Bare Bear?" I hugged Lucky Bare Bear to my chest. I grinned at Hector. "She get small over the years, or I get big." She still fit in her old place, up against my breastbone.

"You feeling sick?" He asked. "You didn't look too good just now."

"I feel wonderful," I answered.


And because I sometimes like a little science with my fiction, I also resurrected the extinct Caribbean monk seal. Sort of.

Monachus tropicalis
From The Fisheries and Fisheries Industries of the United States, by George Brown Goode (1887). This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.

Listen to Gin Hammond reading an excerpt from the audiobook of The New Moon's Arms, released by BBC Audiobooks USA simultaneously with the print version.